DGT 2010 Clock Instructions

DGT 2010 Professional Digital Chess ClockHOW TO SET THE DGT 2010 DIGITAL CHESS CLOCK

The clocks will be programmed by the team captains or tournament organiser for Quick Play Finishes, Incremental Timing and Rapid Play so you should not need to follow the full instructions below as the clock remembers timings which have been programmed in. However, a working knowledge of how the clock works is useful if a clock has to be reset for any reason or if you want to check that the correct timings have been set up.

75 Minutes Plus a 15 Minute Quick Play Finish

For the 2019/20 season the BDCL will use this timing method in divisions 3 to 5 unless the captains have agreed before a match starts to use incremental timing.

  • Each player has 75 minutes to make his/her first 35 moves.
    • Provided both players make the first 35 moves within 75 minutes (the “primary time control”), there is a Quick Play finish with 15 minutes added to each player’s clock.
    • The clock does not display the number of moves made so the players must check their scoresheets to see if 35 moves have been played within the first 75 minutes.
  • A game cannot last more than 3 hours.
  • A player can claim a draw if he has less than 2 minutes left and his opponent cannot win by normal means or is making no attempt to win the game.
  • The benefits of a digital clock is that the 15 minutes is automatically added on and you can see precisely how much time in minutes and seconds you have left which is not possible on an analogue clock when the flag is near to falling.

What Happens When One Player Reaches the Primary Time Control

With digital clocks, the 15 minutes is NOT added on after Black’s 35th move (as is normally done with analogue clocks). Instead, the extra 15 minutes for each player is added automatically when the first player reaches his primary time control.

Example: Suppose the first player to reach the primary time control is Black. Suppose he reaches this time control while he is thinking about his 38th move, and suppose that White has 3 minutes and 5 seconds left on his clock when Black reaches his primary time control. Then

  • No time is added to either clock after Black’s 35th move.
  • At the instant Black reaches his primary time control
    • Black’s clock will start counting down from 15:00
    • White’s clock will move from 3:05 to 18:05, and will start counting down when Black presses his clock button after his 38th move.
    • A black flag will show on Black’s clock to indicate that he was the first player to reach the primary time control; this will disappear after 5 minutes.
    • The clock does not display the number of moves made so the players must check their scoresheets to see if 35 moves have been played within the first 75 minutes.

What Happens When One Player Runs Out of Time

If your opponent fails to complete 35 moves before he reaches his primary time control, the onus is on you to point this out if you wish to claim a win on time. You are recommended to draw a line under move 35 on your scoresheet, as a reminder

  • to make sure you complete your 35 moves before your primary time control
  • to check whether your opponent has reached his primary time control before he has completed 35 moves – in which case you will normally claim a win. Remember, the player who first reaches his primary time control will have a black flag displayed on his clock for 5 minutes – so there need be no argument about which player reached their primary time control first.

If the game progresses to a Quick Play finish, then if a player runs out of time his clock will display a blinking black flag. Under the Laws of Chess, a player is not deemed to have run out of time until his opponent makes a valid claim to that effect (or until the arbiter observes the fact). If you want to claim a win on time, the onus is on you to make a valid claim to that effect. If a draw is agreed before such a claim is made, then the game is a draw, even if one player’s clock is showing that he has run out of time.

If you are observing a game and notice that one player could claim a win on time, YOU MUST NOT POINT THIS OUT – in exactly the same way that you would not suggest a move to either player. Claiming a win on time is considered “part of the game”, and you must not offer a player advice on this during the game.

Setting and Starting the Clock for Games with Quick Play Finishes

  1. Before the start of the game, turn the clock on using the press-button on the bottom of the clock.
  2. The clock will normally “remember” the settings from the last time it was used. On power-up it will display a blinking “Option Number”.
    1. For standard play games matches – use Option 05.
    2. If Option 05 is not being flashed, then use the blue plus and minus buttons and  to bring up Option 05.
    3. Press the blue tick button to select Option 05.
    4. Now check that the clock has “remembered” the correct time controls for Option 05. Keep pressing the blue tick button – five clicks will confirm the primary time control for the left-hand clock display, a further five clicks will confirm the primary time control for the right hand clock, and a further five clicks will confirm that each player’s Quick Play time increment is 15 minutes. If you press and hold the tick button, instead of doing a series of separate clicks, then after a couple of seconds it will confirm all the time parameters. If you are sure that the correct time control has been programmed in previously then after step 2.3 you can simply press the central play/pause button and then move to step 3 below.
    5. When setting a clock for the first time follow the first three steps above. Using the plus and minus buttons set the first number at 1 and press the tick button . The second number will start flashing, set it number at 1 and press the tick button. The third number will start flashing, set it at 5 and press the tick button. The display will then show two numbers. Set both of these numbers at 0 and when you press the tick button the display on the other side of the screen becomes active and the first number will start flashing. Following the same procedure as above set the fourth, fifth and sixth numbers at 1.15 and then the next pair of numbers at 0 0. The clock is now set at 1 hour 15 minutes 00 seconds. The display will now show 2 on the left side and flashing numbers on the right. Enter 0 hours 15 minutes and 00 seconds for the Quick Play period. When the tick button is pressed for the last time the display will show 1.15.
  1. Place the clock on the table and elevate the grey lever on White’s side. The clock then “knows” which player is White and displays a small white king symbol on White’s clock, and a small black king symbol on Black’s clock.
  2. Start White’s clock by pressing the central blue play/pause button . To pause the clock (e.g. for a tea interval) press the same button; to restart the clock after a pause it is the same button once again. Be careful when pressing this button not to do so for more than 2 seconds, as this will throw the clock into a manual clock adjustment mode.

Incremental Time Controls (60 Minutes Plus 30 Seconds Per Move)

This timing method will be used in the BDCL Divisions 1 and 2 for the 2019/20 season.

Known as “incremental” or “Fischer” time controls, each player has 60 minutes plus 30 seconds per move (starting with the first move). Every time you press your clock, 30 seconds is automatically added to your time – it’s as simple as that. There is no requirement to play a certain number of moves in a set time and draw claims under the two-minute rule are not permitted. All moves must be recorded during the entire game. A player will always have a least 30 seconds for his next move regardless of how long the game is. Games can therefore last more than three hours.

Setting and Starting the Clock for Games with Incremental Controls

  1. Before the start of the game, turn the clock on using the press-button on the bottom of the clock.
  2. The clock will normally “remember” the settings from the last time it was used. On power-up it will display a blinking “Option Number”.
    1. For incremental time controls, use Option 18.
    2. If Option 18 is not being flashed, then use the blue plus and minus buttons and  to bring up Option 18.
    3. Press the blue tick button to select Option 18.
    4. Now check that the clock has “remembered” the correct time controls for Option 18. Keep pressing the blue tick button – five clicks will confirm the initial time (1 hour 00 minutes) for the left-hand clock display, a further five clicks will confirm the initial time for the right hand clock, and a further six clicks will confirm that each player’s per-move increment is 30 seconds. If you press and hold the tick button, instead of doing a series of separate clicks, then after a couple of seconds it will confirm all the time parameters. If you are sure that the correct time control has been programmed in previously then after step 2.3 you can simply press the central play/pause button and then move to step 3 below.
    5. When setting a clock for the first time follow the first three steps above. Using the plus and minus buttons set the first number at 1 and press the tick button. The second number will start flashing, set it number at zero and press the tick button. The third number will start flashing, set it at zero and press the tick button and set third number at 0 and press the tick button. The display will then show two numbers. Set both of these at 0 (not at the 30 second increment) and when you press the tick button the display on the other side of the screen becomes active and the first number will start flashing. Following the same procedure as above set the fourth, fifth and sixth numbers at 1.00 and then the next pair of numbers at 0 0. The clock is now set at 1 hour 00 minutes 00 seconds. When the tick box is pressed after the second zero the display switches to the left side of the screen which starts flashing. This where you enter the increment timing. Using the buttons set this at 0.30 (30 seconds) and then the same on the other side. When you press the final tick button the display will show 1.00 on either side.

Place the clock on the table and elevate the grey lever on White’s side. The clock then “knows” which player is White and displays a small white king symbol on White’s clock, and a small black king symbol on Black’s clock.

  1. Start White’s clock by pressing the central blue play/pause button . To pause the clock press the same button; to restart the clock after a pause it is the same button once again. Be careful when pressing this button not to do so for more than 2 seconds, as this will throw the clock into a manual clock adjustment mode.
  2. Option 16 is preset at 25 minutes plus 10 seconds for Rapid Play and Option 17 is preset at 90 minutes plus 30 seconds which is commonly used in congresses. These cannot be altered so any different timing has to be programmed into Option 18.

Fixed period games

These are games where a player has a fixed period of time to play all his moves. This applies to our Club Knockout competition where each player has one hour to complete all his moves. There is no bonus period or time increments.

Go to option 03 on the clock and following the procedures explained above, program 1 hour 00 minutes 00 seconds on each side of the display.

If the first game is drawn then there is a second game at 15 minutes per player. You will need to reprogram the clock to set the new time limit.

If the players are to have different time allocations such as in our rapid play handicap competition, then program the different times on either side of the display.

Note that option 01 is preset at 5 minutes each and option 02 at 25 minutes each, These cannot be altered.

Manually Adjusting the Time

During the game, you can manually adjust the time remaining. Reasons for wanting to do this could be if you find that one player’s clock has been running whilst a dispute is being resolved or when there has been a forced break in play due to a fire alarm or other disturbance. . Press and hold the play/pause button  for two seconds, until the leftmost digit starts blinking. Now you can correct the times of both players, digit by digit. To change the blinking digit, press the plus or minus button  or . Press the tick button  to step to the next digit. After you have ticked all the digits for both players, the move counter can be corrected – but just “tick” this, as we don’t use the move counter. Now press the play/pause button  to resume the countdown based on the corrected times.

What to Do if You Hit Problems

You might run into a number of problems, for example:

  • when setting up the clock before a game, you find that the clock has not “remembered” the correct settings
  • you press the blue pause button for more than two seconds
  • at the start of the game the low battery indicator is displaying on the top centre of the display. If the indicator appears for the first time during a game then there will be sufficient power to complete the game. Change the batteries after the game has finished.

If such a situation arises before the game starts, then your options are to:

  • put the problematic clock to one side, and replace it either with another digital clock or with an analogue clock
  • seek advice from someone who has more knowledge of the DGT 2010

If you run into problems during a game, then, with your opponent’s agreement, pause the clock (if you can) and seek advice.

Other Points

  1. When you have finished your game remember to turn off the clock by pressing the button under the clock to save battery life.
  2. If you programme times incorrectly then you must switch off the clock and turn it on again and start the process again. Also to switch from one option which you have been using to another option you must turn the clock off and on and use the and  buttons to move to the option you require.

 

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